Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Why Do You Want to Become a Teacher?

Dear Graduating Education Majors,

In these lean economic times, you must consider this choice you have made. For many of you, your first year in the field of education will mean driving from one school district to another as you try and keep the bank account out of the red as a substitute teacher. Will that be a valuable experience?
The pay is inconsistent. Some districts will pay as little seventy dollars a day while others fork out one hundred and twenty dollars a day.
The work is inconsistent. You might get called the night before, or you might have to wait until seven in the morning--or not at all. Will you be able to learn from this?
Others will find themselves working for failing school districts with major discipline issues, few resources, and unfocused central offices scrambling to implement a dozen new initiatives. Will that be a valuable experience?
The stress is debilitating. Some adminstrators will blame you for your students' choices while others will rarely check in on you.
The failure is debilitating. You might watch a student refuse to participate because he's given hope, or you might find yourself unable to handle the outlandish behaviors exhibited by students you care deeply for. Will you be able to grow from this?
Some will find themselves working for wealthy suburban districts with well-mannered students, plentiful resources, and clear minded central offices scrambling to ensure high SAT scores. Will that experience satisfy you?
The students are entitled. You might find that your assessments hurt their feelings and GPA--neither of which will make mommy and daddy happy with you. They care about class rank more than learning.
The students are well-adjusted. You won't have many to save, and you will be taken for granted--a necessary person to win over in hopes of a stellar recommendation.
What is that you want to accomplish? What will make you happy? Because in the end, as author/minister Frederick Buechner believes, our vocation is where our "deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

6 Comments:

At 9:40 PM , Anonymous nisha said...

Admiring the time and effort you put into your blog and detailed information you offer!
mba india

 
At 7:34 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

From what you say im suprised your not from the UK. It is EXACTLY the same here. Every word!

 
At 1:23 AM , Anonymous CindyWo said...

Hello,
We are asking for your assistance, and guidance to get the word out about an
amazing program to make small pets available to grammar school teachers
in the classroom.

This program is designed to help teachers that would like small animals as
teaching aids or mascots etc. in the classroom, or to assist teachers who
presently have animals, in obtaining supplies needed to care for the pet.
We realize that teachers have limited funds and our program offers grants
of up to $150.00 for the purchase of small animals such as fish, hamsters,
birds, as well as supplies.

We have the money, we have the program, we have a website, all that is
needed is your help to get the word out. We at Pet Care Trust, feel that
exposing children to the care and responsibility for animals is imperative
in the development of good character and compassion in relationship to all
living things. The care of animals teaches children life affirming values.
If you could pass this along, post it on your website or give me advice on the best
Way to the get this information to teachers it would be much appreciated.

www.petsintheclassroom.org
Join us on Facebook!

 
At 7:34 PM , Blogger Dan said...

I'm enjoying your blog, particularly this post. I'm not a teacher yet, but plan to enter the field after I retire from the Navy. This is good information for me.

 
At 6:57 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I love the Buchner quote.

 
At 6:31 AM , Anonymous remote radiology said...

Great, you have beautifully presented your thoughts in this post.

 

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home